CHILDREN & YOUNG PEOPLE

Welcome to the Children and Young People’s Page.

This part of the website is all about what you might want to know if you are a young person who is going to be working with one of our psychologists.

So What exactly do you do?

We asked a group of young people what they want to know about our service, and they asked these questions (click on each one for our answer).

What actually is a psychologist?

Click to read more

What actually is a psychologist?

A psychologist is someone who is trained to help people through talking about how they are feeling, making sense with them and thinking about how they can feel better. The psychologist working with you or your family has been specially trained to help children, young people or families who might be struggling with how they are thinking or feeling. Psychologists tend to do ‘assessments’ at first, which mean asking questions to find out more about you. Then ‘formulations’ which aim to make sense of what you might have told them – see the leaflet below. They then might offer you talking therapy, which might be by yourself, with your parent/carer or family, or in a group, depending on what you would prefer.

Here are some leaflets which let you know a bit about what a psychologist does:

Close

Why do young people see a psychologist?

Click to read more

Why do young people see a psychologist?

Young people might see a psychologist for lots of different reasons, but most people want help to feel a bit better. They might be struggling with feeling low or worried all the time. They might get angry a lot or be falling out with friends and family. Something might have happened in their life (recently or in the past) which is making them feel rubbish. They might be finding it hard to focus or to do everyday things that they used to find fun. Or they might not be feeling anything at all.

Often when people see a psychologist it is because they want some support, to talk to someone, or want some advice about how they can feel better.

Close

I’ve been told that I need to see a psychologist. Does that mean that there’s something wrong with me?

Click to read more

I’ve been told that I need to see a psychologist. Does that mean that there’s something wrong with me?

No, not at all. Lots of people (of all different ages) see psychologists to get help with how they are feeling. We believe that if you are struggling with your emotions or relationships, there is always a reason behind it. We would work with you to better understand what might be causing your distress, and think of ways to help you to feel better.

Close

What will we do when we meet?

Click to read more

What will we do when we meet?

You will probably be meeting with one (or sometimes two) psychologists. If you are not sure who you will be meeting, it is absolutely fine to ask. There are pictures and information about each of our psychologists on this website page so you can find out a bit more.

We will ask you lots of questions, we might scribble things down, ask you to fill in a questionnaire or two, or draw things out with you. It might seem that we are being a bit nosey at times, but it is our job to find out as much about you as we can, so that we can understand you a bit better. This understanding then helps us to know what things might help you the most. But, it is absolutely fine to tell us if you think that we are being too nosey, or if you don’t want to answer some of the questions that we’ve asked you.

Depending on you, and what you like, we might even play some games together (if your psychologist doesn’t offer to play games, but you want to, just let them know).

Close

What will we talk about? What will you ask me?

Click to read more

What will we talk about? What will you ask me?

We will talk about what brought you to the session, what you think that you might want help with (or why you think other people have said that you might need help), and we will ask you lots of detailed questions about this to try to understand it from your view. We will also ask questions about things like what you enjoy doing, what is important to you, how you have been feeling (both now and in the past), your friendships and family relationships, school or work so that we can get a greater picture of you as a person.

We will probably ask you quite a lot of questions. It might seem that we are being a bit nosey at times, but it is our job to find out as much about you as we can, so that we can understand you a bit better. This understanding then helps us to know what things might help you the most. But, it is absolutely fine to tell us if you think that we are being too nosey, or if you don’t want to answer some of the questions that we’ve asked you.

Close

Do you tell other people what I’ve said?

Click to read more

Do you tell other people what I’ve said?

Psychology sessions are usually confidential, which means that your psychologist will NOT tell other people what you have said in sessions – this is between you and the psychologist.

But, sometimes, it might be helpful to share some of what you have talked about with your family or someone else who is close to you. This can sometimes help them to better understand you, and how they can help you too. Your psychologist will always ask your permission first before sharing your information with anyone else.

There might also be times, when something that you say during in a session makes your psychologist worry about whether you (or someone else) is safe or not. If this is the case, your psychologist may need to tell someone in another care service so that we can make sure that everyone stays safe.

Close

Where will we meet?

Click to read more

Where will we meet?

We will agree before we start where we will be meeting for sessions. It might be that we would meet at our therapy building in Warrington, which has some comfy rooms downstairs which we have sessions in, and lots of spacious rooms upstairs if we need a bit more space.

Here is a link to a virtual tour of our building. If you want to have a look round before your first session, just let us know.

View our virtual tour

If you come to our building, then you will go to reception first, and our friendly receptionist will say hello and help you sign in. She will then give us a call and we will come to meet you.

It might be that your psychologist will meet you at your home. It will be up to you and your parent/carer where is best to meet, such as the lounge or kitchen. Or even somewhere else like your school.

We also do some sessions online (through videocall, like Microsoft Teams and Zoom). Sometimes young people prefer doing sessions this way, as they can be easier to fit into your day, you don’t have to travel anywhere, and you can sit comfortably in your house.

We will agree with you where we will be doing sessions before we start, to make sure that you are happy with the plan.

Close

How does going to a psychologist help?

Click to read more

How does going to a psychologist help?

Seeing a psychologist isn’t helpful for everyone, and it is important that you let us know (or ask someone else, like your parent/carer to let us know) if you are not finding it helpful.

But for lots of young people who are struggling with their emotions or relationships, seeing a psychologist can help. It can help someone to understand why they might feel the way that they do, help them to make sense of their experiences, and think about what they might want to be different in their life. Young people have often told us that talking about their feelings can help and can sometimes make them feel ‘lighter’ and a bit happier. Therapy can also be a way of learning to do things a bit differently and finding strategies that can help you to cope with your feelings or improve relationships.

Close

MY EXPERIENCE OF THERAPY BY ALICE

" Originally, before attending therapy, I had a rough idea of what the process was going to be like and what to expect from the therapy. The first appointment I had with Changing Minds was an assessment, which was around 1 hour. I was previously nervous and anxious about the initial assessment as I did not know what to expect during the assessment, however, during the session the psychologists made me feel comfortable and was able to reassure me. During the assessment, I was asked to talk about my past and present experiences of anxiety and how I was coping with them at that moment in time. I was asked to fill in short questionnaires and the psychologists recommended that I would be best suited for Compassion Focused Therapy (CFT). She explained what the therapy would consist of and what CFT was about.

The first session I had gave me an introduction to CFT and we started to compose a list of situations and things which made me anxious e.g., exams.  We then discussed strategies to soothe the ‘threat system’ (anxiety). During my 6 sessions, I learnt about the three systems (threat, drive and safeness) and how they related to my anxiety. I also learnt about the 6 characteristics of compassion, which by practising will help me be more accepting of myself. Each week I was set small ‘homework tasks’ to do, such as not comparing myself with others etc. By the end of the therapy my anxiety levels had rapidly decreased and I had realised that I do not need to be as hard and punishing on myself and to accept me for who I am.

I feel that I have benefited a lot from my sessions with the psychologist and now I manage my anxiety more effectively. "



Getting Involved

We really want young people to be involved in designing things with us, like our website and leaflets, to help with research projects, and to take part in things like helping us to interview for new psychologists.

If you might be interested in getting involved, please let us know, by sending an email to CMCAFS@changingmindsuk.com CMCAFS@changingmindsuk.com



Why do young people see a psychologist?

Young people might see a psychologist for lots of different reasons, but most people want help to feel a bit better. They might be struggling with feeling low or worried all the time. They might get angry a lot or be falling out with friends and family. Something might have happened in their life (recently or in the past) which is making them feel rubbish. They might be finding it hard to focus or to do everyday things that they used to find fun. Or they might not be feeling anything at all.

Often when people see a psychologist it is because they want some support, to talk to someone, or want some advice about how they can feel better.

Close

I’ve been told that I need to see a psychologist. Does that mean that there’s something wrong with me?

No, not at all. Lots of people (of all different ages) see psychologists to get help with how they are feeling. We believe that if you are struggling with your emotions or relationships, there is always a reason behind it. We would work with you to better understand what might be causing your distress, and think of ways to help you to feel better.

Close

What will we do when we meet?

You will probably be meeting with one (or sometimes two) psychologists. If you are not sure who you will be meeting, it is absolutely fine to ask. There are pictures and information about each of our psychologists on this website page so you can find out a bit more.

We will ask you lots of questions, we might scribble things down, ask you to fill in a questionnaire or two, or draw things out with you. It might seem that we are being a bit nosey at times, but it is our job to find out as much about you as we can, so that we can understand you a bit better. This understanding then helps us to know what things might help you the most. But, it is absolutely fine to tell us if you think that we are being too nosey, or if you don’t want to answer some of the questions that we’ve asked you.

Depending on you, and what you like, we might even play some games together (if your psychologist doesn’t offer to play games, but you want to, just let them know).

Close

What will we talk about? What will you ask me?

We will talk about what brought you to the session, what you think that you might want help with (or why you think other people have said that you might need help), and we will ask you lots of detailed questions about this to try to understand it from your view. We will also ask questions about things like what you enjoy doing, what is important to you, how you have been feeling (both now and in the past), your friendships and family relationships, school or work so that we can get a greater picture of you as a person.

We will probably ask you quite a lot of questions. It might seem that we are being a bit nosey at times, but it is our job to find out as much about you as we can, so that we can understand you a bit better. This understanding then helps us to know what things might help you the most. But, it is absolutely fine to tell us if you think that we are being too nosey, or if you don’t want to answer some of the questions that we’ve asked you.

Close

Do you tell other people what I’ve said?

Psychology sessions are usually confidential, which means that your psychologist will NOT tell other people what you have said in sessions – this is between you and the psychologist.

But, sometimes, it might be helpful to share some of what you have talked about with your family or someone else who is close to you. This can sometimes help them to better understand you, and how they can help you too. Your psychologist will always ask your permission first before sharing your information with anyone else.

There might also be times, when something that you say during in a session makes your psychologist worry about whether you (or someone else) is safe or not. If this is the case, your psychologist may need to tell someone in another care service so that we can make sure that everyone stays safe.

Close

Where will we meet?

We will agree before we start where we will be meeting for sessions. It might be that we would meet at our therapy building in Warrington, which has some comfy rooms downstairs which we have sessions in, and lots of spacious rooms upstairs if we need a bit more space.

Here is a link to a virtual tour of our building. If you want to have a look round before your first session, just let us know.

View our virtual tour

If you come to our building, then you will go to reception first, and our friendly receptionist will say hello and help you sign in. She will then give us a call and we will come to meet you.

It might be that your psychologist will meet you at your home. It will be up to you and your parent/carer where is best to meet, such as the lounge or kitchen. Or even somewhere else like your school.

We also do some sessions online (through videocall, like Microsoft Teams and Zoom). Sometimes young people prefer doing sessions this way, as they can be easier to fit into your day, you don’t have to travel anywhere, and you can sit comfortably in your house.

We will agree with you where we will be doing sessions before we start, to make sure that you are happy with the plan.

Close

How does going to a psychologist help?

Seeing a psychologist isn’t helpful for everyone, and it is important that you let us know (or ask someone else, like your parent/carer to let us know) if you are not finding it helpful.

But for lots of young people who are struggling with their emotions or relationships, seeing a psychologist can help. It can help someone to understand why they might feel the way that they do, help them to make sense of their experiences, and think about what they might want to be different in their life. Young people have often told us that talking about their feelings can help and can sometimes make them feel ‘lighter’ and a bit happier. Therapy can also be a way of learning to do things a bit differently and finding strategies that can help you to cope with your feelings or improve relationships.

Close